10X WATER SUMMIT 2019 Conference Agenda

Tuesday, March 26

opening reception and Early Registration/Check-in

5:30-8:00 PM 


SESSION 1

5:45 pm

LESSONS FROM THE CONTEMPORARY WEST

Welcome Reception at ASU’s Beus Center for Law and Society 111 E Taylor St, Phoenix

The Ten Across Water Summit will open with a very timely conversation about water in the West and the implications for the entire 10X initiative. The subject will be the Colorado River and the distribution of water among the seven states and tribal nations dependent upon this finite resource. By the time of the 10X Water Summit, the critical negotiations around the Lower Basin Drought Contingency Plan will likely be concluded. The lessons learned and the implications for leadership-intensive projects of comparable importance and urgency will be discussed.

Above, L to R: Sarah Porter, director, Kyl Center for Water Policy, ASU; Governor Stephen Roe Lewis, Gila River Indian Community; James Eklund, Squire Patton Boggs, attorney; John Ross, author; David Festa, senior vice president, ecosystems, Environmental Defense Fund

 

Wednesday, March 27

 

Registration/Check-in and Breakfast

7:30-8:30 AM


SESSION 2

8:30 - 8:45 AM

welcome

Ten Across Sessions at Events on Jackson 245 E Jackson St, Phoenix

Greetings from key officials, civic leaders, and sponsors. Confirm the Ten Across rationale and the unique opportunities of 10XW2 set this year in Arizona in the fifth largest city in the country.

Above, L to R: Governor Doug Ducey, Arizona; Mayor Kate Gallego, City of Phoenix, Arizona; Steve Seleznow, Arizona Community Foundation, president and CEO; Wellington “Duke” Reiter, ASU, senior advisor to the president; Mike Hummel, general manager and chief executive officer, SRP

 

SESSION 3

8:45 - 9:45 am

TEN ACROSS: THE LABORATORY FOR THE FUTURE

The US Interstate 10 corridor provides the most compelling window on the future of the country, one which presents the challenges of the 21st century in the highest relief. A project spanning the entire continent, Ten Across positions this region as a living laboratory for resilience and adaptation. On the front lines of environmental, social, and technological change, panelists will discuss what is unique about the geography, perspectives, and issues involved and what the rest of the country can learn from a close examination of this region.

Above, L to R: Wellington “Duke” Reiter, senior advisor to the president, ASU; Justin Ehrenwerth, The Water Institute of the Gulf, president and CEO; Bill Fulton, Kinder Institute for Urban Research, Rice University, director; Corinne LeTourneau, 100 Resilient Cities, managing director, North American region


SESSION 4

9:45 - 10:45 am

TEN ACROSS AND THE LIMITS TO GROWTH REVISITED

Within the 10X portfolio are 5 of the 12 largest cities in the U.S., with much of their growth enabled by 20th century technologies (the automobile, available land, production housing, and air conditioning). Unrestrained growth is likely unsustainable, with many factors in play. Maybe none of these is more profound than water, in terms of drought, access and inundation. Panelists will address the influence of water on planning, density, expansion, infrastructure, technology, and even the possibility of retreat when necessary.

Above, L to R: Jeff Hebert, partner, HR&A Advisors, Inc.; Margaret Wallace Brown, interim director, planning and development, City of Houston; Kathryn Sorensen, director of water services, City of Phoenix; Marissa Aho, chief resilience officer, City of Houston; Bridgett White, director of planning, City of San Antonio


10:45 - 11:00 AM:

BREAK


SESSION 5

11:00 am - 12:00 pm

TEN ACROSS AND THE BOUNDARIES OF WATER 

In the 19th century, John Wesley Powell famously mapped the West, its limited water, and the most logical locations for settlement. Disregarding this information, the West was carved into simple blocks and cities were placed far from reliable resources. Water has no regard for artificially imposed boundaries, resulting in conflicts between geography and political jurisdictions seen within the 10X project area. How we handle these points of friction is an indicator of our ability to manage the larger challenges of climate change and the resultant social, economic and environmental impacts.

Above, L to R: Char Miller, author and W.M. Keck Professor, Pomona College; Nicole Ferrini, Director of Community + Human Development, City of El Paso; Ian James, reporter, Arizona Republic; Georgia Ackerman, executive director and riverkeeper, Apalachicola Riverkeeper


12:00 - 1:00 PM

NETWORKING LUNCHEON

Events on Jackson 245 E Jackson St, Phoenix


SESSION 6

1:00 - 2:00 PM

THE EVIDENCE

An essential driver of the 10X project is a wide spectrum of “ways of knowing”, ranging from on-site testimonials to data visualizations derived from earth observing satellites. In combination, we now have a vivid understanding of the impact of human activity on the land, and an ability to anticipate highly probable futures.  With this knowledge, we really have no excuse for failing to prepare for a very different world. Panelists will present findings from diverse sources, materials with the capacity to transform stakeholders from observers to change agents.

Above, L to R: Wellington “Duke” Reiter, senior advisor to the president, ASU; John Ross, author, The Promise of the Grand Canyon: John Wesley Powell’s Perilous Journey and His Vision for the American West; Jay Famiglietti, executive director, Global Institute for Water Security, University of Saskatchewan; Rob Jernigan, Gensler, co-regional managing principal, southwest region; Trevor Houser, Rhodium Group, partner, and Climate Impact Lab, co-director


SESSION 7

2:00 - 3:00 PM

RISK, PREPARATION, RECOVERY

As demonstrated by the previous panel, the future is both predictable in the longterm (we can see the trendlines) and random with regard to sudden externalities and traumatic events. Resilience is driven by the acknowledgement of a knowable future and preparation in advance to adapt to such stresses and shocks in all of their manifestations. The panelists will discuss the necessity, means, and benefits of developing a culture of preparedness.   

Above, L to R: Alex Kaplan, vice president of global partnerships, head, North America, Swiss Re; Kathy Baughman McLeod, director, Adrienne Arsht Center for Resilience, Atlantic Council; Abrahm Lustgarten, senior environmental reporter, ProPublica; Michael Spranger, chief risk management officer, Caribbean Catastrophe Risk Insurance Facility


SESSION 8

3:00 - 4:00 PM

THE emergent ECONOMIES OF WATER

Water is an essential ingredient to life, but it is not free and is becoming increasingly less so. As supplies and access are reduced, the value of this precious resource necessarily rises.  With changes in supply and demand, the commodification of water is inevitable and with it the development of markets, trading, and speculation. Commenting on the general trend and drawing on case studies from the 10X area, panelists with a diverse set of perspectives will share observations on an increasingly active economy built around water and implications for the future.

Above, L to R: Will Sarni, founder and CEO, The Water Foundry; Todd Brady, director, global public affairs and sustainability, Intel; Will Chow, vice president, InstarAGF; Joe Gysel, president, EPCOR USA; Cynthia Campbell, water resource management advisor, City of Phoenix


4:00 - 4:45 PM

AFTERNOON BUSINESS/CONVERSATION BREAK


5:00 - 8:30 PM

BUS TRANSPORT TO DESERT BOTANICAL GARDEN RECEPTION

Desert Botanical Garden 1201 N Galvin Pkwy, Phoenix, AZ 85008


SESSION 9

6:30 - 7:15 PM

VISIONS, NETWORKS, OUTCOMES

Desert Botanical Garden 1201 N Galvin Pkwy, Phoenix, AZ 85008

This moderated conversation will feature two key civic leaders based in the Phoenix metro area, each committed to the resiliency and prosperity of the region.  Both have also been recognized nationally and/or internationally for the innovations they have brought to their respective institutions and the networks they have built to scale up solutions for the future.   

Michael Crow, president, Arizona State university; Steve Seleznow, president and CEO, Arizona Community Foundation


7:15 - 8:00 PM

ELECTRIC DESERT EXHIBIT

Desert Botanical Garden 1201 N Galvin Pkwy, Phoenix, AZ 85008


Thursday, March 28

Registration/Check-in and Breakfast

7:30-8:30 AM


SESSION 10

8:30 - 9:30 AM

TEN ACROSS AND THE NATIONAL CLIMATE ASSESSMENT

Ten Across Sessions at Events on Jackson 245 E Jackson St, Phoenix

The National Climate Assessment summarizes the impact of climate change on the United States, now and in the near future. This session will feature a discussion of the recently-released 4th NCA as well as past iterations, and the potential of this work to inform transformational decision making. Special attention will be directed to the areas within the 10X region and implications for the creation of a more resilient and adaptable society, one that responds effectively to the challenges outlined in the document.

Above, L to R: Jim Buizer, professor and director Climate Adaptation and International Development, University of Arizona; Kathy Jacobs, professor and director, Center for Climate Adaptation Science and Solutions, University of Arizona; Susanne Moser, geographer; Lynne Carter, adjunct faculty, Louisiana State University


SESSION 11

9:30 - 10:30 AM

DECISION MAKING IN UNCERTAINTY

This is a time of instability in almost every domain, and responding to the major issues of the day and the complexities therein is challenging. The management of water is very high on this list of issues, where forecasts are of limited certainty. Nevertheless, decision-makers need to do exactly that and with the best information available.Panelists will outline how the interests of multiple stakeholders and reliable data sets are ideally synthesized to arrive at optimal plans of action.Included in the discussion will be the requirement of strong civic and political leadership.

Above, L to R: Pat Gober, research professor and professor emeritus and co-founding director, Decision Center for a Desert City, ASU; Dave White, director, Decision Center for a Desert City, ASU; David Groves, co-director, Climate Resilience Center, and director, Center for Decision Making Under Uncertainty, RAND; Pat Mulroy, non-resident senior fellow, Climate Adaptation and Environmental Policy, The Brookings Institution


10:30 - 10:45 AM

BREAK


SESSION 12

10:45 - 11:45 AM

CAN WE HANDLE THE TRUTH?

The purposeful arrangement of 10X panel topics will culminate in a discussion of how best to communicate about critical issues requiring adjustments to our present trajectories.Water is an existential matter and seemingly obvious in importance.But at a time when science, data, and facts are in dispute, a complete and coherent understanding of the issues is difficult. Journalists and writers of national prominence who have waded into water issues of all kinds will discuss their strategies for effective messaging and how their work is received by the public and decision-makers.

Above, L to R: Greg Burton, executive editor, Arizona Republic; Noah Gallagher Shannon, journalist, NYT Magazine; Luke Runyon, National Public Radio; Cynthia Barnett, journalist and author; Abrahm Lustgarten, senior environmental reporter, ProPublica


11:45 am - 12:30 PM

LUNCH


CLOSING

12:30 - 12:45 pm

closing, announcements, adjourn

Above, L to R: Steve Seleznow, president and CEO, Arizona Community Foundation; John Davies, president and CEO, Baton Rouge Area Foundation; Wellington “Duke” Reiter, senior advisor to the president, ASU



documentary
screening

6:00 - 8:00 pm

SOLD OUT!


FREE screening of “unnatural wonder”

Arizona Republic/azcentral.com Documentary Screening 
Contact:
 (602) 444-8764 for questions regarding the documentary screening event.

You’re invited to a screening of a documentary film produced by The Arizona Republic/azcentral.com, featuring the “unnatural wonder” of the Colorado River as it traverses the Grand Canyon. An environmental reporting team spent a 16-day journey on the river to record how humans have transformed one of the world’s natural wonders into a human-managed “unnatural wonder” with dams and other techniques, altering the ecosystem for centuries to come. The screening will be followed by a discussion and Q&A featuring key figures from the film and respected journalists.

About The Arizona Republic/azcentral.com: The state’s largest media organization was the winner of the 2018 Pulitzer Prize in explanatory journalism for “The Wall,” which included a documentary film mapping the US/Mexico border from the Gulf of Mexico to the Pacific Ocean. Reporters traveled by air, land and water to explore wall-related issues in both countries. Environmental reporting at The Republic/AZCentral is funded with a multi-year journalism grant from the Nina Mason Pulliam Charitable Trust.

When: 6-8 p.m. Thursday, March 28, 2019. Doors open at 6, screening begins at 6:45pm, panel discussion 7:15pm.

Where: First Amendment Forum, Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, ASU, 555 N. Central Avenue, 2nd Floor, Phoenix AZ 85004